Skip to content

Three-Part Math and Problem-Solving

This is a copy of a post made on February 22, 2011

Thank you to all staff, students and parents for a successful Math Day this morning!  What a wonderful sight to see everyone engaged and learning through collaborative three-part math problem-solving.  Below are some pictures from the event.

Part 1 - Teacher introduces the problem to the students

At the beginning of the lesson, the teacher introduces the math problem to the class as a whole.  This is where the teacher can model his/her thinking, elicit thoughts, possible strategies and contributions from the students, and give them time to time to attempt to solve the problem together.

Part 2 – Students are given time to collaborate in small groups to solve a similar problem together
During the next part of the lesson, students work in smaller groups (2-4 is ideal) on a problem similar to the one presented during the lesson that explores the same concept.  Students have access to math manipulatives, and through various strategies and peer communication, work together to put their thinking on paper in the form of words, pictures and/or numbers.  The teacher is free to circulate at this time to provide feedback to students, ask groups questions to help them rationalize their thinking, or support a group or individuals if they’re struggling.  This part of the lesson provides the bulk of the learning.

Part 3 - The students are brought back as a whole group to share what they learned and strategies they found helpful

The last part of the lesson is the consolidation of the learning.  Groups share their results and answers with everyone else.  The teacher is there to support feedback, to help guide the students to share their learning and to ask questions to help further the concept taught, and/or to bridge the day’s learning into the next.
Here are some other photos from our awesome morning:

 

Advertisements
One Comment

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. Good-bye for now geometry… | Miss Kristalyn's Class

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: